YouBrand RoundUP: Auto Edition

ZoomTilt is bringing you YouBrand RoundUP, a once a week in-depth analysis of  video content from top brands in focused industries.

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The auto industry is no stranger to viral video marketing. In fact, there is a reason why we chose this industry as our first industry of focus in the YouBrand Round Up.

Last week Crain’s Business Detroit published this article that discusses how marketers in the auto industry are focusing on delivering TV content that jumps to the “second-screen”; those devices hardly anyone can live without: lap-tops, tablets and mobile phones. It is proven that TV content drives internet search so the logic is that eyes that are watching advertisements on TV, especially ones that leave them with something to search for, or something that has “repetitiveness” and it just has to be watched again, will generate “second-screen” attention and more importantly it will be shared on “second-screen” platforms like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Another Crain’s Business Detroit article highlights the “Top 10 viral auto ads” however, all the listed ads also began on television and only entered into the “second screen” sector following their television debut. Yet, in order to be considered “viral” they had to go to the second screen. Interesting.

It is fair to say that the auto industry considers a successful advertising campaign to have “unimaginable Superbowl like numbers,” and these days marketers have to look to the “second-screen” chatter to calculate these numbers accurately.

So, who is taking the brave and the incredibly smart leap over the budget-wasting step of television and heading straight to the “second-screen” from the auto industry. Here’s our YouBrand RoundUP: The Auto Edition:

The 8 YouTube Original Channels: Automotive:

What began as eight featured “original channels” promoted through the “YouTube Original Channels Series” now lists about ten channels that focus on topics that affect consumer opinions on their car/motorcycle purchases, fantasies and general knowledge.

On the Drive Channel, Swedish luxury car designer, Koenigsegg, had their own show which goes inside the meticulous process to create the car, which is a sleek, high-end, sports car, in nine-episodes.

Jaguar F-Type presents Desire:

The most recent video campaign in the auto industry accompanies Jaguar’s release of their first sports car in 50 years. The 12 minute short film that debuted online last month stars Homeland’s Damien Lewis and features a commissioned song by Lana Del Ray. The film itself only has about 43,000 views on YouTube while additional videos such as the behind the scenes and the making of have between 1,000 and 3,000 views.

This is nowhere near “viral” or the Superbowl like numbers that advertisers in the auto industry like to see but there is a lot we can learn from this. I’ll explain further.

Audi and BMW, been there, done that:

In 2010, Audi released an original mini-series The Next Big Thing which starred Justin Timberlake. Big Thing, unlike its predecessor BMW’s The Hirewas told serially, meaning you had to watch the episodes in order to understand the story, whereas Hire was a series of different stories with the same lead character portrayed by Clive Owen.

Both Big Thing and Hire had views that dipped into the several hundred thousands. It is hard for me to sit here in 2013 and even state a fair and accurate number because fans of the cars as well as the actors and the series’ themselves also uploaded the episodes to their channels as well to share (key word here) with their friends.

Ford, still doing it and doing it well:

Ford has a decent amount of original content that they have been churning out over the past few years. Late last year they announced the launch of their original series to accompany the release of the new Ford Escape, Escape My Life.The series has over 2,000 subscribers to its channel and over 1 million views. Its channel page has added features that allow viewers to create their own content that relates to the series, such as the Barry memes, of which one can assume that when it is shared (huh, huh, that word again!) it will spark the interest of others and they’ll click through a bunch of hyperlinks to find out where the source of the meme was – and oh – “ta-da! Its part of Escape My Life…that’s weird I was just thinking about a new car . . “

I really enjoy the series over the other’s that I’ve discussed in this YouBrand RoundUP but that is because I am a woman, who works in the film industry that needs a car that is not only functional for my work but is comfortable, stylish and affordable (I’m single too.).

At first glance, one would say that Jaguar “did it wrong” because they chose to make a 12 minute film as oppose to a short episode no more than 4-5 minutes. Something shorter would’ve gotten them more views, no?

I wouldn’t consider Jaguar a failure based on their low number of views. The Jaguar F-type clearly has a very niche customer. And there aren’t many of them. The average consumer isn’t purchasing a sports car, let alone a luxury sports car. Those guys, well, they are like Damien Lewis in a gray suit and tie, classy, educated and fantasize about beautiful Latina women.

I’ll stop beating around the bush: Visual marketing and advertising these days needs to go beyond showing your consumers what the product is or who uses it. Brands, such as the brands listed here in our YouBrand RoundUp: Auto Edition have gone beyond the traditional commercial that does so and have told the stories of their consumers, or at least how their consumers want to see themselves.

I’m just saying. I’m a quirky, fun-loving, humorous, late twenty-something who drives a crossover very similar to the Ford Escape.

 

 

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