Can a Social Video Series Save HubSpot $31K?

HubSpot is offering a $30,000 referral bonus for referrals to help them recruit qualified software developers. ZoomTilt offers a social video package priced at $29K. If the use of a widely-shared, demographically-targeted and Hubspot-branded social video series (which we’d be happy to produce) inspires [at least] two great developers to apply to Hubspot, ZoomTilt would save HubSpot $31,000 without blunting the force of their HR-driven PR campaign.

Every company on the cutting edge of technology needs great software developers, right? Hubspot agrees.

Know a great developer? Refer them to HubSpot for $30K!

This common notion has been emphatically reinforced by Inbound Marketing heavyweight HubSpot’s announcement of a $30,000 bounty for a successful developer referral. Hubspot hopes to fill 15 developer jobs through the referral program, meaning there is up to $450K to be claimed by those possessing an extensive developer database. 

Is throwing money in the direction of the problem the best way to attract top developer talent? Generally accepted thought says that monetary compensation is often secondary to developers, who typically care most about things like:

  • Autonomy
  • Environments where they can learn and try new things
  • Creativity in problem solving
  • Building something that matters
  • Excellent management
  • Recognition

Does Hubspot have a culture problem, preventing top talent acquisition? Not from conversations I have had. Two weeks ago, I had the pleasure of talking with three Hubspot developers after an event, all were quick to evangelize Hubspot’s working environment as one of the best in which they had participated.

Hubspot also goes above and beyond to promote great office culture and share culture insights openly. Hubspot’s CultureCode Slideshare garnered over 300,000 views in three weeks after hitting the web.

So why the $30,000 referral bonus? Is there a different way to get the same result?

To answer this question, I reached out to Luis Reyes, video content producer at video game company Nexon. Luis was the creative force behind Nexon’s web series, ‘Testers’, and had this to say about the impact a web series can have on company culture,

“In general, I would say, just having video content that featured the staff, either fictionalized by actors in Testers, or in interviews in Blabber Box (which was our variety show), it helped engage everyone that worked at Nexon. In fact, our Marketing Director from about two years ago sited our video content as one of the reason he wanted to come to Nexon. So I think there is a benefit.

A web series is always good. Its [impact is] two fold. (A) I think that a web series helps put a human face on an industry for a broader audience; and (B) It becomes like defacto entertainment for the current staff, able to articulate the frustrations and emotions of an industry in a way that more blanket entertainment can’t.”

What do you think? Is sharable, entertaining video a valuable recruiting tool internet companies are missing out on? Does spending $29K on a ZoomTilt social video package that results in one qualified developer hire or a developer remaining at Hubspot makes financial sense? What are some other creative solutions to this problem?

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