Filmmaker Highlight: Eric Won

I’m not that into social media, but once in a while Twitter really comes through.  It has been recommending filmmakers with web series for me to follow, and so I often go and watch a pilot episode.  I watched the pilot of The Division and was completely floored — this thing looks like prime time tv.  So I sought out the filmmaker in LA — Eric Won.

Eric Won on set

I expected Eric to be a veteran who had worked in Hollywood on some well-known shows.  Instead, he told me this humble origin story.

Eric attended the LA film school and majored in directing.  He directed his first short while in school and sent it to the film festival circuit for a year.  He hoped to get an agent or a feature deal, but nothing happened.  “It was terrible,” he says.  “I was at a loss for a couple of years.  What can I do?  I gotta do something….  I really wanted to do a feature film, that’s what people say gives you notoriety, but I didn’t have the money.”

He looked through his old notes on script ideas, hoping for something along the lines of 24 or lost — a sci-fi or action with cliffhangers and character development.  He found a seed there for what would become The Division.

Now is the time when I have to ask if you, dear reader, have watched The Division.  Have you?  No?  If you haven’t, you should go watch it right now.  www.WhatIsTheDivision.com.  No really, I’ll wait.

At this point in our interview, Eric hadn’t yet mentioned all the big projects he’d worked on, so I asked him point blank.  How did you get the experience and connections to make a web series this good?

“The division is my third or fourth short film, though I also produced a couple of shorts [for others].  And I’m just working with people I know.  For example, I met a DP at a party and checked out his website.  Then I hired him for a short film, and thought, I gotta work with this guy again.  He ended up becoming my best friend, and he’s my DP for The Division.”  For the rest of the crew, he says he gets a lot of referrals.

My next question was about budgets.  A series like this has to cost money — the production values are too high to do it on favors alone.  And Eric was very up-front with the numbers.  The episodes cost on average about $7,000 each — less for the earlier episodes and more for the later ones.  About 70% of the funding is from Eric, and 30% from Kickstarter, Indiegogo, and some ad revenue.  They have a Monster Vault product placement in one episode — you can see the details on their website http://whatisthedivision.com/participate.

I asked Eric for a set story — because every film shoot has crazy things happen.

“We got kicked out of one of our locations — it was the parking lot of my apartment. After ½ way through the shoot, someone from the management company came out and asked if this was a student short film.  At that point we had only shot about half of the scene, we had an entire action sequence left.  They wanted us to leave, so I had to change the script on the spot.  I had to get rid of everything…I was walking to the management office and I started thinking o f how I could change the script so we could finish our shoot in less than 60 seconds.  And I thought of a way to finish it.

“’Start wrapping up,’ I called out to the crew, ‘we have to shoot right now.’  My DP wanted to change lenses, but I said ‘No no no! We have to shoot NOW!’  And we got the take.

“You can see it at the end of episode one — notice the jumpy cuts?  I had to go that route because I didn’t have enough footage.  There was a whole fight sequence we never got to shoot.  The Secretary of Defense was supposed to be in the van, the actor was there but we couldn’t shoot him.”  Visit this link to see the scene Eric is describing: https://vimeo.com/84082139.

Ah, filming.  Everyone has a story like that — to be a director you have to be able to think on the fly, change your story, and make it work.

I asked Eric about releasing the series.

“I wrote the first three three scripts for The Division and shot one episode without knowing if I’d shoot more or not.  But I released the first episode as if I had all ten.  It’s all about presentation, how you present it visually, tell it differently.  You wrap it like a really nice gift for the viewer.”

For more of Eric’s work, see his website: Ericwonfilms.com

EricWon2_MG_8269

We Are Heading to FutureM!

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Calling all Branded Entertainment FANatics!

We are SO excited to announce that we are hosting a session at this year’s FutureM in Boston, October 16-18. FutureM brings a one-of-a-kind experience to Marketing and Media trendsetters by debating the cutting-edge development and future landscape of Marketing. The programs are unique, forward-thinking, and will challenge, integrate and bring to life what tomorrow holds for businesses in the digital age.

 Our session “Better than RedBull: Converting Your Brand into an Entertainment Hub will be held on October 17th at 9:30 A.M. This interactive panel will involve YOU with our guest panelists Evan Rimer (Walden Media), Matthew Valentinas (Entertainment Legal Counsel) and Sharon Vosseler (FoA Entertainment). Come tell us a bit about your brand’s creative brief and we will pitch you social video ideas live on the stage! 

As a valued member of the ZoomTilt community, we hope you’ll join us – register for FutureM today at FutureM.org .

 

Look forward to seeing you there!

Web Series Creator Spotlight: Katie Shannon and Audrey Claire Johnson

Let’s face it, Hollywood and their blockbusters have been dominated by men for decades now. Television has given a slight rise to powerful female centric programming with shows like Weeds, Sex and the City, GIRLS, and The Big C, all of which is on premium, pay-for television.

Independent filmmakers have turned to the web to generate programming and stories that they believe is missing from the likes of Hollywood. Programming that can be made accessible to a much broader and larger audience. But with the likes of Machinima and Rooster Teeth it is safe to say that the “Hollyweb” is also favors a slight edge towards content that is generally considered male-centric.

Alas, we over here at ZoomTilt have stumbled upon the dynamic duo of Katie Shannon, writer/director and Audrey Claire Johnson actress/producer; both funny-gal extraordinaires. that are embarking on their first collaboration together: K&A, which stands for Karley and Alex.

Written and Directed by Katie Shannon of Thompson Films. Starring Audrey Claire Johnson and Ashley Elmi. Produced by Katie Shannon, Audrey Claire Johnson and Michael Madden.

Written and Directed by Katie Shannon of Thompson Films. Starring Audrey Claire Johnson and Ashley Elmi. Produced by Katie Shannon, Audrey Claire Johnson and Michael Madden.

Katie and Audrey worked together previously on 617, The Series, which also included producer/actress, Amy DePaola (sound familiar?) You can view the second season of 617 on ZoomTilt’s YouTube page.

@ZoomTilt: Ok, first off, this question is for Katie. Tell us about the concept of K&A? How did you come up with it? 

@KDuffShannon: K&A is a comedy about the friendship between Karly (played by Johnson) and Alex (played by Ashley Elmi) as they navigate their complicated lives in the city of Boston. One of my favorite shows is “Sex and the City” because it is honest and truthful about women today and their relationships with one another. It reminds me of my relationship with my best friend [from college], who currently lives around the corner from me. However, their is one huge difference between us and the ladies of SATC; I’m gay and she is straight. A lot of the ideas for the series come from our relationship (not all but some!). For storytelling, it’s a character dynamic that hasn’t been explored all that much. When I hear or see something I think would be great for the show, I write it in my phone. If someone ever read the list, they would probably think I’m crazy!

@ZoomTilt: What makes Karly and Alex’s story different from some of the more popular female duos that are currently out there? (ex: “2 Broke Girls”) 

@10ThousandHangs (Audrey’s Twitter): The combination of one straight and one lesbian lead protagonists is blatantly underexplored in sitcom format. Television comedies with a broad audience have found success with straight/gay leads, normally shown as leading/supporting man/man or man/woman. Because of the female straight/gay premise, I’m already interested in their history, their friendship, and their chemistry with other characters on the show.

@KDuffShannon: Both these characters don’t hold back. Their lack of caring what people think has allowed me to explore so many story lines. I’m partial to comedy shows like Family Guy and It’s Always Sunny Philadelphia for never apologizing for what they put out there and talking about topics that many of us think about, but are too afraid to bring up.

@ZoomTilt: What are the benefits of distributing the series online? What are also the challenges?

@KDuffShannon: Online distribution gives us the benefit of being able to reach anyone in the world and have a much broader audience for that. The challenging part, however, is to get people to discover it in the first place. Anyone who has a camera can make a web ddfseries these days. You need to think to yourself: what makes your [concept] different? Why should someone take time out of their day to watch? It’s also even more challenging with bigger and bigger names getting into the web series scene, so you really need to take the time and steps to make your concept stand out.

@10ThousandHangs: If you’re a creative artist in any medium, you will have challenges deciding on the best way for your work to be seen. Not just any way, the best way – and one that is financially doable. With K&A we’ve studied other projects that have been crowd funded, how they interacted with their audiences and where their content was eventually hosted. Its been a huge help.

@ZoomTilt: Interacting with audiences is important online, how are you both hoping that audiences will interact with K&A? 

@KDuffShannon: I hope people find the show as funny as I think it is (obviously I’m partial). I hope people can see that females can be just as funny as men. And trust me…these two ladies are.

@10ThousandHangs: Goals would be to have a hefty number of subscribers on our YouTube channel and dialogue on social media about each episode as they are released. We’d also like our fans to share their stories about their exterminators with us, and, of course, get 1,000,000 signatures on to petition HBO to pick it up……..obviously.

@ZoomTilt: So, what are some points of the series you are looking forward to shooting? Can you give us some secrets about what to expect? 

@KDuffShannon: I’m looking forward in shooting the episode “Doing Nice Shit For People” because in that episode Audrey’s character gets tasered. We read that episode during our auditions for the character of Alex, and her [Audrey] performing the act of being tasered made me laugh every single time.

Karley takes a much needed rest on Alex's lap. (From L to R: Johson and Elmi)

Karley takes a much needed rest on Alex’s lap. (From L to R: Johson and Elmi)

@10ThousandHangs: There’s an episode about a rat in the apartment. I am paralyzed by rats, phobic to a traumatic degree. K&A stand and huddle on the couch while some weird stuff goes down off camera. It’s classic suspense, not seeing the “violence” on screen while we react in horror. I can’t wait to play that scene.

@ZoomTilt: What are some female-centric web-series out there that you enjoy?

@KDuffShannon: I was an intern on set once for the filming of The Guild, so I really enjoy that one. There was also a lesbian web series called 3Way, which was one of the funniest web series I have ever seen. It’s sad but the lack of female leads in web series is a reflection of what you see on television. Obviously as a female filmmaker you want to try to change that as much as you can. I’ve never made a project where female characters weren’t the focus and I plan to stick to that.

@10ThousandHangs: I worshiped Broad City, would die to have been on Delusional Downtown Divas by Lena Dunham. Other web sketch groups that do incredible work are Good Neighbor, Olde Payphone and Paulilu.

The admitted lack of female genres within the web series community is a reflection of the industry as a whole. I spend my energy focusing on women crushing the scene online, on television and back to feature length blockbusters. They are my inspiration when choosing projects, writing scripts, and aspiring to be a great comedic actress.
Touche. Thanks for your time ladies! We are happy to support you. Please let us know when we can expect the first episode!
Support K&A by taking a visit over to their Kickstarter page and learn about their team on Facebook and stay up to date with them on Twitter.
If this photo is any indication of the realistic bond between these two ladies, we are extra hyped to watch!  (From L to R: Elmi and Johnson)

If this photo is any indication of the realistic bond between these two ladies, we are extra hyped to watch!
(From L to R: Elmi and Johnson)

Instagram Video or Vine: Why Not Both?

Vine vs Instagram Video

Image credit: Matt Nazaro

In the biggest user divide since Apple and PC, the showdown between Twitter’s Vine
and Facebook’s Instagram Video has prompted heated conversations about which
service reigns supreme for branded entertainment. However, as a marketer, you don’t necessarily need to get caught up in the debate, since both platforms offer unique benefits for content marketers and advertisers looking to start conversations with customers and prospects around engaging, sharable video.

Overall, online video engagement is booming as users rush to view, create, and share “viral” videos and clever branded content with friends and family. It’s no surprise, then, that social video sharing has seen massive growth across all devices.  For marketers, both Instagram Video and Vine present an opportunity to distribute branded entertainment in a short-form, packaged format most consumers are actively participating in and seeking out.

Already, brands have begun to take advantage of Vine and Instagram Video, two of the
most popular social video sharing apps. Though technically these services are
competitors, you don’t have to choose a side: both platforms have their advantages and short-comings, and both can be leveraged in order to connect with consumers cross-platform in interactive and authentic ways.

Vine

Key features:

  • 6 seconds
  • Loops
  • Embeddable for easy sharing
  • 13 million+ iOS users & ~1 million Android users

Consumer attention spans have never been shorter – particularly when it comes to intrusive and uninteresting content.  When use properly, six seconds can be more than enough time for a company to create unique, sharable messages for its fans and social media followers. With Vine, sending a clear, creative and succinct message is imperative. But remember, less is more.  Keep the video simple and avoid bombarding
fans with too much information in the short clip.  Moreover, Vine’s intrinsic loop function makes the app particularly suited for repetition-friendly content like animated GIFs, memes and recurring sequences.  There are also great opportunities for brands and agencies to incorporate Vines into contests, product launches, sneak-peeks and helpful tips, hints and informational content.  At the end of the day, if your brand has a large presence on Twitter, Vine is a must.

Instagram Video

Key features:

  • 15 seconds
  • 13 filters
  • Editable
  • 130 million current Instagram users

Yes, you have a few more seconds of story-telling time with Instagram Video.  Nonetheless, make sure your clip captures viewers’ attention early on so viewers don’t drop out early. Filters and editing ability allows more creative freedom, but don’t abuse it. Again, simplicity and creativity are key. If your company already has a large fan base on Instagram, use video features to broaden brand awareness, improve your messaging to mobile users and engage your social media followers with richer content.

Ultimately, Vine and Instagram Video both share benefits video marketers shouldn’t ignore. In particular, both services are optimized for search engine indexing with the ability to use hashtags and tag individual users. Brands can search for user-generated content and monitor the ways fans share or respond to specific branded content campaigns, messages and hashtags.

Since Vine and Instagram Video have natural distribution channels through their respective parents Twitter and Facebook, distributing content is relatively cheap across both platforms.  Moreover, with branded Vines are shared four times as often as branded online videos, and branded content making up four percent of the top 100 tracked Vines, there’s evidence to suggest short-form video users are receptive (or, at least, more agnostic) to creative branded messaging.

As a marketer, if you aren’t already using Vine or Instagram Video, it’s time to
start.  Keep it simple; send a clear, effective message; don’t be afraid to experiment; and amplify the consumer-brand conversation through innovative social video.

Introducing ZoomTilt Analytics

Today, we’re pleased to announce the beta release of ZoomTilt Analytics – a self-service software tool for A/B testing videos to help users identify and optimize their top-performing video content. The goal of ZoomTilt Analytics is to help businesses and video creators:

  1. Make better, more audience-targeted videos by compiling feedback and data from real, relevant viewers;
  2. Make smarter decisions about what videos to create, how to edit them and how to release them; and
  3. Increase video marketing return on investment.

The trial version of ZoomTilt Analytics, which allows experimenters to easily set up and run video A/B tests from YouTube, is now available as a free service on ZoomTilt.com. In addition, our ZoomTilt Analytics Premium service now gives brands, agencies and media companies the ability to create and customize video A/B tests around specific target audience profiles and marketing metrics.

We’re very excited to share ZoomTilt Analytics with you, we have plans to introduce lots of new features and capabilities, and we welcome any feedback or questions you’d like to share with us. Interested in learning more about the benefits of ZoomTilt Analytics Premium for your business? Contact us today to get started.

Check out the video below for a demo of ZoomTilt Analytics in action:

5 Lessons on the Future of Video from Mary Meeker

Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byer’s rockstar, internet-trend-watching analyst Mary Meeker has just released the 2013 edition of her annual internet trends report at the Wall Street Journal’s D11: All Things Digital Conference.

And while Meeker focuses the bulk of the report’s attention on sound, mobile and wearable tech, the 2013 Internet Trends Report also gives a big nod to the importance and evolving presence of video in the digital landscape. So without further adieu, here are 5 key lessons on the future of video courtesy of Mary Meeker (with some analytical interpretation via ZoomTilt).

Lesson #1: Mobile isn’t just a “second screen”

We are moving beyond an era where your smart phone is just the thing you use to Tweet during TV commercial breaks. The majority of mobile device use occurs somewhat counter-intuitively within people’s homes, the average phone user checks social media on their phone nine times per day, and mobile as a share of total internet traffic is showing exponential (not linear) growth.

Mobile Internet Growth

Lesson for the video community: If you work with digital video content, expect your content to be consumed (and hopefully shared) via mobile. Whether it’s a Twitter Vine or longer-form content, mobile is not just a second screen – in many cases it is a primary screen, so make sure (1) your content is discoverable on mobile and (2) anticipate the viewing experience on a small screen (potentially with poor audio and a time-constrained viewer). See also ReelSEO’s great article on 5 ways to optimize your video for mobile viewing.

Lesson #2: YouTube is a social network (and a big one, at that)

In addition to being a subsegment of the world’s largest search engine, YouTube is also the world’s second largest social network. YouTube is also demonstrating user growth at rates much higher than Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Google+.

YouTube is a social network

Lesson for the video community: try actually being social both within and outside of YouTube. On YouTube: be active in the comments feed, comment on other videos you like and response to comments and messages about your own videos. Outside of YouTube: network and collaborate with other creators to formulate great original content, help get your work more exposure and get better economies of scale with audience-building.

Lesson #3: Short-form video is exploding in popularity

In large part thanks to the momentum of Twitter’s Vine, Meeker points out that short-form video creation and consumption is growing rapidly:

Twitter Vine

However, short-form video presents both a tremendous opportunity and a tremendous challenge. Because of the format, successful Vines must be immediately and impressively visual, and the medium makes telling a story, developing characters or provoking audience emotional engagement highly challenging. Unsurprisingly, the vast majority of vines get very low engagement, with few views and even fewer retweets. By comparison, the Vine’s that break through and achieve a degree of viral lift typically showcase highly clever, thoughtful cinematography optimized for the animated GIF-like repetitive format.

Lesson for the video community: despite what your agent or agency might tell you, Vine isn’t the holy grain for your branding, social media or content creation needs: it is a tool, and one that must be used wisely. Think your audience really wants to watch your Vine? No, your audience would rather sit down and watch a full-length episode of Mad Men with riveting plot development, so if you’re going to start cranking out Vines do your best to get creative with it and experiment.

Lesson #4: America does not equal the internet

One of the most awesome lessons from Meeker’s presentation is just how international the internet has become. Compared to America’s 244 million internet users (at a population penetration of 78%), India already has 137 million internet users at a population penetration of only 11%. Meanwhile, China boasts 564 million internet subscribers, while Brazil is coming on strong with 88 million web-connected people. Also, interestingly according to Meeker, we don’t share as much content on the internet as other cultures:

US social media sharing

Lesson for the video community: Think about an international audience when you’re creating and distributing digital video and look into things like foreign language programming or captioning on your YouTube content, both areas where Machinima typically does a great job.

Lesson #5: Content is becoming more democratic (and, thereby, more competitive) than ever before

Wondering why nobody’s watching your videos? Well, it might be because of this, but it probably also has something to do with the fact that 100 hours per minute of video are uploaded to YouTube every single minute. Talk about a flood of content that’s showing no sign of slowing down.

Damn Thats a Lot of Video

Lesson for the video community: be really deliberate about the content you create a give people a compelling reason to watch it. The best type of content to achieve this is video that creates value for the viewer – ideally a combination of emotional value (e.g., funny, exciting, shocking) and relevant information value.

Learn anything else from Mary Meeker’s presentation? Agreed or disagreed with anything we wrote above? Feel free to drop us a line in the comments below or give a Twitter shoutout to @ZoomTilt.

Orabrush – Insights from Austin Craig

I was in Utah back when people were still using their toothbrushes to clean their tongues, assuming they even knew tongue hygiene mattered at all. Then a good friend of mine wound up getting involved in a quirky YouTube ad campaign that started with this video:

Fast forward some years, and through a whole lot of pretty amazing breakthroughs in YouTube advertising, Orabrush is now nearly as ubiquitous as the king of hygiene appliances: the toothbrush.

The following is adapted from a conversation I recently had with Austin about Orabrush, and what he thinks of ZoomTilt’s mission and business model. He’s a smart guy, and his responses were good enough that you shouldn’t be surprised to find a follow-up post here sometime in the future. Orabrush’s story and success is strong evidence in support of the ideology that drives ZoomTilt.

Jordan PetersenFirst off, tell me the story of how you got involved with Orabrush.

Austin Craig: I got involved with Orabrush on accident. It’s a funny story.

Orabrush was developed by Bob Wagstaff. We call him Doctor Bob, but he’s not a dentist. He has a PhD in Biochemistry and Nutrition. He spent most of his career researching and developing solutions for the consumer market. He started working on the Orabrush when he was managing a group of missionaries [for the Mormon Church] in the Philippines, and heard multiple reports that his missionaries had bad breath. How were they supposed to help and teach people who were offended by their breath stench?

It was years in development, but when he had it market ready, it was the market itself that wasn’t ready. A $40,000 infomercial sold fewer than 100 units. He begged store managers to put it on their shelves, but when they did, it stayed on the shelf. Customers didn’t know what it was, or what it did, so they didn’t bother with it.

In a final reach for help, he went to a class at BYU, and asked them to conduct some market research. His primary question was whether he could sell the Orabrush online. The group that studied it decided the answer was no. According to their research, only 8% of consumers would consider buying online. It was a lost cause. “Better go work on your golf swing, Dr. Bob.”

But one student in the class objected. 8% of the Internet? That’s millions of people. Wasn’t that worth pursuing? Dr. Bob liked that sound of that. They got together and struck a deal. Bob and his new assistant, Jeffrey Harmon, would work nights and weekends. As payment, Bob would give his old motorcycle to Jeffrey. It sure beat the 10-speed he was using at the time.

Jeffrey’s day job was at FamilyLink.com, with me. We were on the social media intern team, tasked with finding the most effective ways to promote on Facebook and Twitter. We spent the whole day in a windowless office on social media. It turns out that even Facebook and Twitter get boring after the 4th hour, so we had to concoct some games to keep ourselves sane. One of the favorites was to push Austin’s buttons. The whole team knew I had strong opinions on politics, technology, company policy, whatever. It didn’t take much more than, “Hey, look at what Congress is doing!” to get me to fly off the handle.

Jeffrey knew my antics, and that I had experience on camera as a broadcast journalism student. He had an idea. “Hey Austin, can you freak out like that, only on camera, and about bad breath?” Sure thing, I said. For $100, I’ll rant and rave about whatever you like.

We filmed after work on a Friday at Oz Pool Hall. I acted, Jeffrey produced/directed, Dr. Bob held the microphone, and our friend Devin Graham filmed and edited the video. It was fun. Afterward, we grabbed some burgers and caught a movie at the dollar theater.

That was the beginning.

Jeffrey worked like crazy in the newly debuted YouTube advertising system, tweaking every knob, dial, and piece of meta-data on the video. With each iteration, testing one variation against another, it became more and more effective, until he knew that for $30 spent, Orabrush would make back $35 in sales. When the campaign is cashflow positive, you can roll all profits back in to growing the campaign, and it snowballs.

Before long, we were making another video. And another. And hiring employees. And more videos. I signed a contract to continue as the official spokesman. It’s just grown ever since.

JP: Would you describe how Orabrush used a running web series to greatest effect in advertisement? What’s more important: entertainment or sales? Or do those priorities evolve over time, and how?

AC: The “Diary of a Dirty Tongue” was something that helped Orabrush in a big way. The video strategy was critical to our company, and involved two prongs. One was our sales videos; videos meant to work mainly as commercials, telling people about the benefits of the Orabrush and where they can buy. The second angle was the web series. Diary of a Dirty Tongue was meant to grow an audience on YouTube. We wanted subscribers, people who grant us permission to communicate with them regularly.

But people don’t want to be sold. You aren’t friends with somebody who is always trying to sell you something. We wanted media content that was valuable as media. We tried to make it funny, playful, and sharable. It starred Morgan, the giant human tongue. Really, it was local standup comedian Dave Ackerman who created the character. We had the concept of a giant, comedic, slovenly tongue. Dave Ackerman brought him to life.

It worked, too. We consistently brought in more and more subscribers. People knew that we’d have a new episode every week. We toyed with different formats, and different days to publish, but through it all, we gained over 150,000 new subscribers. We fostered new fans and brand advocates. People who never would have been interested in Orabrush before came to us through the webseries, and became die hard fans of the brand and product.

After a year and a half of weekly videos, we ended the series. It had been a huge success, but as a company, our efforts were going to other parts of the business. The lesson was clear, though. Good serial content online has an audience.

JP: You recently released a new product called Orapup, an Orabrush for dogs. How did your web series help you introduce this new product? 

AC: The primary tie between the web series and the Orapup launch was our subscribers. The fans we gained through the web series were still subscribed when we launched Orapup. We had a ready base to hear about our newest product. The two were separated by about a year, but that subscriber base made a difference in the launch. The initial Orapup video on the Orabrush channel had over 4 million views before we launched the Orapup channel.

*****

Thanks times a hundred to Austin for his willingness to share some of his thoughts with us. We’re encouraged by his experiences, and the success Orabrush has built upon the foundation of high-quality web series.

Do you think Orabrush’s model is replicable? Is their story proof positive that ZoomTilt’s mission and goals are founded upon good theories? Do you have other thoughts about what they’ve done, or what we’re doing? Please, share them in the comments!